Kardla (Fire)

It is ACRAWSA’s objective to serve as a platform for established and emergent scholars, activists, practitioners and writers to engage in conversation with each other, and establish alliances across differences while critically engaging in public debates of immediate relevance to the association and the constituency it represents. In light of this, topics for submission will be selected to reflect noteworthy political events or movement agendas primarily in Australia, but also in the broader Asia-Pacific region. Articles that raise questions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sovereignty will be prioritised.

From time to time the editor(s) will also invite writers to participate in a symposium on a particular topic.

Due to the format, blog issues will be published monthly and past contributions archived accordingly. Contributions by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars, activists and practitioners will be prioritised.

If you are interested in proposing an article, please email the blog editor Maria Elena Indelicato with a 250-word (max) proposal at acrawsablog@acrawsa.org.au. Final submissions should be no longer than 1,500 words.

Warra (Voice)

ACRAWSA has established this platform to support (domestic and international) postgraduate students. Postgraduate students are often the most likely to experience academic isolation, silencing or simply a lack of sustained institutional support, particularly if their scholarly interests challenge or are a departure from the quantitative or industry-linked modes of research increasingly valorised by neoliberal universities, to the exclusion of all else. These same students often receive the least support for publishing their work.

From this perspective, Warra is designed to support ACRAWSA’s postgraduate community by providing them with the opportunity to showcase their work and receive editorial mentorship. Therefore, if submissions do not meet publication requirements, they will nonetheless be assessed and provided with thorough feedback rather than being necessarily rejected. Warra will therefore function as an academic or creative writing workshop, while providing a window into the rich and diversified work of postgraduate students in the country.

This section will publish contributions on a rolling basis and be open to any topic. As with Kardla, contributions from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander postgraduate students will be prioritised.

If you are interested in submitting a piece to Warra, please email the blog editor Maria Elena Indelicato at acrawsablog@acrawsa.org.au with a 250-word (max) pitch or description of how you would like to develop your contribution. Final submissions should be no longer than 1,500 words.

Wangkanthi. Yurikaityanthi (Reviews)

Most academic and literary journals in Australia only pay incidental attention to academic events, artistic productions and/or cultural representations whose primary concern is the discussion of race, racism, and whiteness. To date, the community of critical race and whiteness scholars in Australia has lacked a common platform on which to discuss our impressions of books, exhibitions, events, etc. despite the importance of this work for reclaiming space in institutions from which our work is often excluded.

To meet this need, ACRAWSA extends an opportunity to scholars, activists, practitioners, writers, etc. who are interested in reviewing novels, plays, films, art exhibitions, as well as academic books and conferences and other academic events worthy of collective attention.

If you are interested in submitting a review or commentary, please email the blog editor Maria Elena Indelicato at acrawsablog@acrawsa.org.au with a 250-word (max) pitch or description of how you would like to develop your contribution to Wangkanthi. Yurikaityanthi. Final submissions should be no longer than 2,000 words.